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All posts from Nigel Pringle

14th January 2018 at 5:04pm

Nigel Pringle
North Yorkshire

2325 posts

All five parts together take up about a total an hour....it's a wonderful historic piece.
No need to wait for a wet day.

Then, as the slogan goes...You've read the book , you've seen the film now buy the bees :)

Last edited at 5:05pm on the 14th January by Nigel Pringle

13th January 2018 at 11:50pm

Nigel Pringle
North Yorkshire

2325 posts

AdamDarling wrote:
I like the look of the lyson 'gate'
 
Yes they are good. I wanted one on my melter /creamer but the thread size was wrong for that size of tank....means I have to go back to Abelo for another honey settling tank that will fit one....Interestingly they also do a foot pedal operated model as well as the manual.
13th January 2018 at 8:00am

Nigel Pringle
North Yorkshire

2325 posts

A lot of our current "kit" was designed nearly a 100 years ago and has had little or no modification since.
There are improvements in the old honey gate as in this new design below.
We seem reluctant to lose the old traditional methods.
Bottling-Tap.jpg

Last edited at 8:00am on the 13th January by Nigel Pringle

12th January 2018 at 7:17pm

Nigel Pringle
North Yorkshire

2325 posts

Thanks for the heads up.
12th January 2018 at 9:34am

Nigel Pringle
North Yorkshire

2325 posts

Gave up using honey gates for bottling honey years ago.
I use warm honey and an oven sterilized glass jug.
Yes you get drips on the outside of the jars and there is a technique involved but just so so much faster. Once I have my warm honey runny and filtered I can easily do 60 x 12oz jars, wash them, dry them, add anti tamper label, print and add label and clean up in about 1 hour.
11th January 2018 at 3:13pm

Nigel Pringle
North Yorkshire

2325 posts

nealh wrote:
 the queens influence down here is widely factored by Paynes buckfast X. That said they do seem to be fairly gentle in temper though prolific and find double Nat BB's are requred for late spring and summer. 
 

That's a distinct possibility. I know that around Sand Hutton near York where APHA have their labs and apiaries it was mainly Buckfast bees they kept and crosses in those area are reckoned to produce gentle fecund queens. Apparently beekeepers nearby "migrate" their hives as close as possible to take advantage of the Buckfast drone saturation in the area....or so I'm reliably informed by one their old head apiarists.
Wish they would move their labs nearer to me....
11th January 2018 at 11:19am

Nigel Pringle
North Yorkshire

2325 posts

nealh wrote:
to be honest haven't come across an out and out really bad colony for a  few years, 
  
You are very fortunate that the local's appear friendly in your area. If you would like to see what ours are like I'll send you a queen from the next swarm I collect. The more I talk to beekeepers from different areas the more I find the temper of the locals varies from region to region.
10th January 2018 at 4:56pm

Nigel Pringle
North Yorkshire

2325 posts

Interesting history behind it, thanks for the story.
Be interesting to see how it works on re-queening belligerent local bees with a queen from a different strain, rather than like for like.
That is where major problems occur in my experience.
8th January 2018 at 5:40pm

Nigel Pringle
North Yorkshire

2325 posts

Patrick Lehain wrote:
I am however slightly uneasy about making definitive claims that you cannot overdose with any chemical introduced by a beekeeper into a hive. 
 

You are quite right Patrick. It may be better phrased as saying the maximum amount of oxalic acid you can fill your vaporizer's dish with is unlikely to cause problems unless repeatably applied one vape immediately after another. With a sublimox the maximum possible dosage is about 3 grams, impossible to load more. Not sure what the maximum amount you can pile into a passive vaporizer pan before it spills over the sides is, probably not a lot more.
8th January 2018 at 4:27pm

Nigel Pringle
North Yorkshire

2325 posts

This needs to be quantified further. Lasi's research was on single brood boxes with local bees. Many of us run double brood boxes.
The point of adding an excess amount of acid when vaping is not to increase efficiency (as the article points our above 1.25g  has no advantage)but what it does do is ensure the minimum quantity is applied to the bees. There are various inefficiencies in the passive delivery systems such as condensation onto the open mesh floor etc. Simply vaping 1.25 g from under an open mesh floor means that you are not gettign maximum efficiency.

Which would be
easier and cost less: treating colonies
with brood with oxalic acid ten times or
treating broodless colonies once? Both
will give the same level of varroa control

This is a trick question, the real question should be when!
If you want healthy winter bees that have no varroa related problems you need to be treating when brood is present in late August/Early September.
If you leave trickling/vaping as your sole method in the winter there is the potential for a lot of varroa damage to have already occured in thiose valuable winter bees.

Despite many saying no need to treat in winter if succesfuly treated in autumn....I treated mine to be sure just before Xmas (vaping) and was very glad I did. 2 out of the 12 hives in my garden dropped a worrying number of varroa....yet they were dropping nothing after their autumn varroa treatments!

Last edited at 4:40pm on the 8th January by Nigel Pringle