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Topic: General Husbandry - honey

26th June 2015 at 6:46pm

AdamDarling
-- MODERATOR --
Norfolk

5736 posts - View

Over-filling came upa little while ago and my response then, as now is that I would rather be criticized for supplying too much than too little. I don't know what the tolerance of measurement is for filling a jar. Scales to 1% would give +/- 3.5 g for a 350 g jar would be reasonable for the scales themselves as nothing is 100% accurate. But then you would - presumably - be allowed some tolerance of over-fill or under-fill as well. I've never seen it written anywhere that I recall.
26th June 2015 at 6:53pm

mpenn
York & District

13 posts - View

I have just had a recent trading standard visit  we discussed lables and weights and I ask is it ok to be over weight the answer was yes it is ok

BTW I havent been a noughty boy just a routine visit

Last edited at 6:55pm on the 26th June by mpenn

26th June 2015 at 8:14pm

Nigel Pringle
North Yorkshire

2325 posts - View

That's good to hear. Seems overfilling is another myth, among many. Not sure I'd argue the point in an assessment even if the assessors have been taught the wrong answer.

Last edited at 8:14pm on the 26th June by Nigel Pringle

26th June 2015 at 10:08pm

Simon Rice
Bishops Stortford

29 posts - View

Hi Gerry,
Just for the record, no negative criticism intended on my part, with my "raised eyebrows" comment. The two examiners were excellent, encouraging me throughout the assessment. I enjoyed their company and learning from them.
26th June 2015 at 10:21pm

Roger Patterson
-- MODERATOR --
Wisborough Green

3314 posts - View

I have always believed it to be illegal to sell over weight/volume. I understood it came from the practice in pubs that us Sussex folk call a "Sussex half". This is where the pint is drunk to about an inch from the bottom and the barman/maid filled it up. I understood it was referred to as the "overpull law", but if you Google it all you get is reference to the police pulling you over!

Roger Patterson.
26th June 2015 at 10:52pm

Gerry Collins
Doncaster

535 posts - View

Naturally granulated is where the filtered honey is jarred and the honey allowed to crystalise (granulate) within the jar. Soft set is where the honey is allowed to granulate in bulk before being warmed until it just moves so that it can be  stirred or agitated before bottling. Each glucose crystal wil be coated with the fructose containing mother liquor preventing the crystals from interlocking / joining together so that it can be spread like butter.  Seeding can be used in both cases to produce a smaller smoother crystal. Soft set can be produced using the  Dyce process (after Prof Elton Dyce who patented the process). This involvesa short period  pasteurisation by heating to dissolve all crystals and kill any yeast cells followed by rapid cooling and introduction of finely granulated honey (the seed)

http://www.mexinc-products.com/en/articles/articleseng/142-dyce-laboratory-for-honey-bee-studies
27th June 2015 at 3:41am

Nigel Pringle
North Yorkshire

2325 posts - View

Gerry Collins wrote:
Naturally granulated is where the filtered honey is jarred and the honey allowed to crystalise (granulate) within the jar. Soft set is where the honey is allowed to granulate in bulk before being warmed until it just moves so that it can be  stirred or agitated before bottling. Each glucose crystal wil be coated with the fructose containing mother liquor preventing the crystals from interlocking / joining together so that it can be spread like butter.  Seeding can be used in both cases to produce a smaller smoother crystal. Soft set can be produced using the  Dyce process (after Prof Elton Dyce who patented the process). This involvesa short period  pasteurisation by heating to dissolve all crystals and kill any yeast cells followed by rapid cooling and introduction of finely granulated honey (the seed)

http://www.mexinc-products.com/en/articles/articleseng/142-dyce-laboratory-for-honey-bee-studies
 
Thanks for that.
27th June 2015 at 3:54am

Nigel Pringle
North Yorkshire

2325 posts - View

Roger Patterson wrote:
I have always believed it to be illegal to sell over weight/volume. I understood it came from the practice in pubs that us Sussex folk call a "Sussex half". This is where the pint is drunk to about an inch from the bottom and the barman/maid filled it up. I understood it was referred to as the "overpull law", but if you Google it all you get is reference to the police pulling you over!

Roger Patterson.
   
You should check the 2009 weights and measures act regarding food productiom. It makes interesting reading. You can have a certain percentage of your jars underweight as long as it is only a small percentage of the whole. Not a single mention of overfilling being a heinous crime.

However, you are quite right about overfilling alocoholic drinks. The quantities that alcoholic beverages can be served in is defined under separate legislation. That does not apply to foodstuffs that can be sold in any weight.

Last edited at 5:44am on the 27th June by Nigel Pringle

27th June 2015 at 7:58am

Ruary Rudd

858 posts - View

Thymallus wrote:
  
You should check the 2009 weights and measures act regarding food productiom. It makes interesting reading. You can have a certain percentage of your jars underweight as long as it is only a small percentage of the whole. Not a single mention of overfilling being a heinous crime.

However, you are quite right about overfilling alocoholic drinks. The quantities that alcoholic beverages can be served in is defined under separate legislation. That does not apply to foodstuffs that can be sold in any weight.
   
If you use the 'e' mark then the average weight of the batch must be not less than the stated weight, there is quite a considerable lee-way for a 454g jar the lee way is 13.7g


If the 'e'mark is not used then each jar must contain at least the stated weight.
27th June 2015 at 8:38am

AdamDarling
-- MODERATOR --
Norfolk

5736 posts - View

So is the conclusion that we're OK to overfill - provided the honey isn't fermenting as it might get you drunk? 

As in "Barman, I'll have a half of your soft-set and a packet of pork scratchings"
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